PAST EXHIBITIONS

On Blushing

Alice Langbrown, Dayle Palfreyman, Steph Arrowsmith, Willa Smart

10 Jun – 21 Jul
Stephanie Arrowsmith, Ice in Twilight, 2022, oil on linen.

Stephanie Arrowsmith, Ice in Twilight, 2022, oil on linen.

2022

Eros exists because certain boundaries do. In the interval between reach and grasp, between glance and counter-glance, between ‘I love you’ and ‘I love you too,’ the absent presence of desire comes alive. But the boundaries of time and glance and language are only aftershocks of the main, inevitable boundary that creates eros: the boundary of flesh and self between you and me. And it is only, suddenly, in the moment when I would dissolve that boundary, that I realise I never can. 

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Ko wai a Māpihi? This is not water

Cae Te Wheoro Heke, Nick Denton

14 Apr – 28 May
Image courtesy of Nick Denton and Cae Heke.

Image courtesy of Nick Denton and Cae Heke.

2022

Pōneke is a city full of streams. At least five run through the district named Te Aro, formerly amongst diverse wetlands and gardens, meeting Te Whanganui-a-Tara at the shoreline of Te Aro Pā.

They are still here. Waimapihi flows down from the gully in Waimapihi Reserve, through a forest of trees reaching up like vines into a shaded canopy. It meets the top of Holloway Road, channelled through a low concrete wall, a steel grate, and a pipe. It follows the road down Aro Street. If you know where to stand you can hear the gushing, tumbling of a waterfall under your feet. It traces ancient pathways now hidden, underneath buildings, crossing streets and the hum of people. Finally, Waimapihi flows past the foundations of Te Aro Pā at the end of Taranaki Street, before its waters rejoin Te Whanganui-a-Tara.

The stream is named for Māpihi (Ngāi Tara, Ngāti Māmoe) a wahine Rangatira who bathed here, although her stories are also hidden from view to most who cross her stream. Fish follow its course up and down dark underground paths, migrating through brick culverts and reinforced concrete apertures. Kōkopu can be seen upstream, and tuna and kōaro are among a thousand other species who touch this awa. Except, Waimapihi, for most of its length, is not a stream. It’s not even water.

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Wishing you well

Hanna Shim 심한나

11 Feb – 30 Mar
Hanna Shim, One day I’ll fly on the bird, 2021, digital video and animated pencil drawing, 0:45, still.

Hanna Shim, One day I’ll fly on the bird, 2021, digital video and animated pencil drawing, 0:45, still.

2022

Soft, sewn sculptures by Hanna Shim 심한나 make space for elastic encounters within the rigid white walls of a gallery space. One of the artist’s goals in creating pliable art is to defeat the architecture that restrains and constrain the artist and their works from the wildness of making.

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Kua whati te rākau

Hōhua Thompson

11 Feb – 30 Mar
Hōhua Thompson, Kua whati te rākau research image, 2022, digital drawing.

Hōhua Thompson, Kua whati te rākau research image, 2022, digital drawing.

2022

Tension and precarity are not new concepts for most cultures, especially since the upheaval caused by the COVID-19 pandemic. Māori have dealt with these issues before. Great migrations, wars and the constant onslaught of colonisation have given us examples of how our tīpuna handled these situations.

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He Kanohi Kitea

Tallulah Farrar

26 Nov 2021 – 4 Feb 2022
Tallulah Farrar, He Kanohi Kitea, 2021, digital illustration and vinyl print mural. Image courtesy of Cheska Brown. 

Tallulah Farrar, He Kanohi Kitea, 2021, digital illustration and vinyl print mural. Image courtesy of Cheska Brown. 

2021
Reading Room Mural

"He kanohi kitea" (a face seen) is an important saying and value in Māoridom, acknowledging the importance of meeting people face-to-face to build relationships and trust. Enjoy’s new commissioned artwork He Kanohi Kitea is situated in our reading room, an inviting place to nurture and encourage these interactions to take place. Within a global pandemic this acknowledges kanohi kitea hasn't always been possible, along with the realisation of how important the physical presence of seeing people face-to-face is to our overall wellbeing.

The name He Kanohi Kitea was gifted by our close friend and neighbour Tehani Buchanan. Thank-you so much for supporting this kaupapa. Much aroha to the whānau and for your mahi.

Sophia Coghini, Tautai Arts Intern 2021 at Enjoy has overseen this project as commissioning curator.

Thank-you to Jim & Mary Barr for your crucial support of this project.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Bling Ring

Clementine Edwards, Jenny Takahashi Palmer, Louie Zalk-Neale, Ming Ranginui, Nââwié Tutugoro

22 Oct – 11 Dec 2021
Bling Ring Moodboard, 2021, digital collage. Courtesy of Vanessa Mei Crofskey, exhibition curator.

Bling Ring Moodboard, 2021, digital collage. Courtesy of Vanessa Mei Crofskey, exhibition curator.

2021

Precious items can have an important role in ritual and performance, with connections to sacred and intimate body parts; be it a handmade vessel we drink water out of, a comb we brush our hair with, or an elegant ring passed down from generations. They can be made of rare materials, be well-crafted and artisanal, but more vitally tend to have emotional significance or spiritual importance, something that is passed on and carried through us, evoking the memory and presence of loved ones.

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Pieces of

Ruby 嫦潔 White

16 Jul – 25 Sep 2021
Image: Ruby White, Piggle, 2021. Image courtesy of the artist. 

Image: Ruby White, Piggle, 2021. Image courtesy of the artist. 

2021
Summer Residency

Pieces of is an exhibition of handmade ceramics, video work and biofuel research by Tamaki-based artist and cook Ruby White. Concentrating on rediscovering and repurposing traditional clay working techniques to create functional ceramic cookers White combines old and new technologies to "look with apprehension and hope toward climate change and our collective future."

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Help Yourself

Turumeke Harrington and Grace Ryder, with Sarah Hudson, Saskia Leek, Kristin Leek and Greta Menzies

28 May – 10 Jul 2021
Turumeke Harrington, View 8, 2021. Image courtesy of the artist.

Turumeke Harrington, View 8, 2021. Image courtesy of the artist.

2021

This exhibition is created for each other, excuse our selfishness. We offer each other conditions to work that avoid and deter the ridiculous and indefensible aspects of "normal" practice. This has been an extended period of trust and experimentation, resulting in an exhibition that cradles and nurtures the others’ ambitions, at times quite literally.

—Grace Ryder

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Lay in measures

Ed Ritchie, Megan Brady

9 Apr – 22 May 2021
Ed Ritchie and Megan Brady, Research image, 2021. Image courtesy of the artists.

Ed Ritchie and Megan Brady, Research image, 2021. Image courtesy of the artists.

2021

Lay in measures is a new exhibition by Ōtepoti Dunedin-based artists Megan Brady and Ed Ritchie. The exhibition considers how architectural composition unconsciously affects bodily experience, through small-scale interventions of sound, subtle sculptural installations and replicated furnishings.

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He waiata aroha

James Tapsell-Kururangi

9 Apr – 22 May 2021
James Tapsell-Kururangi, He waiata aroha, 2021, still. Image courtesy of the artist.

James Tapsell-Kururangi, He waiata aroha, 2021, still. Image courtesy of the artist.

2021

I started making this work when my kuia passed. I traveled home to live at her house for a year. I wanted to be close to her again. A story she told me that has stuck with me: the account of her father’s drowning on the Tongariro River in Tūrangi. I have since visited the spot again and again.

How does time pass in a day, in a year, in a life? Within Māori cosmology, Māui and his brothers famously bound Tama-nui-te-rā, onwatcher to our humanity. Before, it was cold and Māori were starved of time. Perhaps our movements were slow. Inhibited by an endless night.

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History reserves but a few lines for you

Areez Katki

19 Feb – 3 Apr 2021
Image: Areez Katki, In Small Places (Farrokh & Sohrab), 2018, cotton thread hand embroidery, hand-loomed tea towel. Image courtesy of the artist.

Image: Areez Katki, In Small Places (Farrokh & Sohrab), 2018, cotton thread hand embroidery, hand-loomed tea towel. Image courtesy of the artist.

2021

For History reserves but a few lines for you, Areez Katki presents a series of textile works which build upon the artist’s ongoing enquiries into craft traditions, sites of queer intimacy and the complexities of migratory experience.

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Bound in secret knots

Bena Jackson, Teresa Collins

19 Feb – 3 Apr 2021
Bena Jackson and Teresa Collins, After looking in the shed we looked on top, 2021, digital video, still. Image courtesy of the artists.

Bena Jackson and Teresa Collins, After looking in the shed we looked on top, 2021, digital video, still. Image courtesy of the artists.

2021

Working with discarded goods and salvaged materials, Bound in secret knots includes new sculptural and moving image works by Pōneke Wellington-based artists Bena Jackson and Teresa Collins.

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JustUs

Chevron Hassett

11 Dec 2020 – 13 Feb 2021
Chevron Hassett, JustUS, 2020, series of eight photographic prints, uniforms, detail. Image courtesy of Cheska Brown.

Chevron Hassett, JustUS, 2020, series of eight photographic prints, uniforms, detail. Image courtesy of Cheska Brown.

2020

JustUs is a new solo exhibition by Te Upoko o Te Ika-based artist Chevron Hassett. Drawing from his experiences growing up in Te Awakairangi Lower Hutt, Hassett has developed a photographic installation that explores the lived realities and representation of Māori men in contemporary Aotearoa.

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!ERROR!

Laura Duffy

18 Sep – 24 Oct 2020
Laura Duffy, Research image, 2020. Image courtesy of the artist.

Laura Duffy, Research image, 2020. Image courtesy of the artist.

2020

For !ERROR! Pōneke-based moving image artist Laura Duffy has invited artists to dance in front of a green screen set up, and transported them to another, limitless, realm.

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Cutouts

Ammon Ngakuru

18 Sep – 24 Oct 2020
Ammon Ngakuru, Research image, 2020. Image courtesy of the artist.

Ammon Ngakuru, Research image, 2020. Image courtesy of the artist.

2020

Cutouts is an exhibition of new paintings and assemblage sculptures by Ammon Ngakuru. Exploring the material economies of gathered objects and a particular architectural site, Cutouts prompts us to reconsider biography or identity, exploring the way that history is read in the post-colonial context of Aotearoa New Zealand.

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Bush coat

Daegan Wells

31 Jul – 12 Sep 2020
Daegan Wells, Research image, New Zealand Parliament, 2020. Image courtesy of the artist.

Daegan Wells, Research image, New Zealand Parliament, 2020. Image courtesy of the artist.

2020
Summer Residency

Bush coat is an exhibition of new sculpture, moving image and textile work by Murihiku Southland-based artist Daegan Wells. Taking the social politics of wool as its starting point, Bush coat playfully interrogates the role of natural materials—and the craft forms and industry around them—in our shared and personal histories.

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Fire-lit kettle

Annie Mackenzie, Ashleigh Taupaki, Georgette Brown, Imogen Taylor & Sue Hillery, Li-Ming Hu, Salote Tawale

19 Jun – 25 Jul 2020
Annie Mackenzie, Research image (Thermettes), 2020. Image courtesy of the artist.

Annie Mackenzie, Research image (Thermettes), 2020. Image courtesy of the artist.

2020

Creative energy is frequently spoken about in relation to a particular kind of passion or ignition, from the feeling of an initial spark to a sense of burnout. We often circle around the metaphor of tending a fire when trying to grasp at this as a question of maintenance as well as one of intuition. This speaks to resources, knowledge and relationships that require ongoing care and attention.

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2020 Summer Residency

Daegan Wells

3 Feb – 14 Mar 2020
Image courtesy of the artist.

Image courtesy of the artist.

2020

We’re thrilled to announce Daegan Wells as Enjoy’s 2020 Summer Resident. Currently based in Southland, Daegan will spend six weeks in Pōneke from 3 February–14 March 2020. While here, he’ll stay at the Rita Angus Cottage in Thorndon, working out of the cottage’s Fernbank Studio.

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